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Union County Museum Announces Annual Meeting Guest Speakers

The Union County Museum Society is pleased to have two guest speakers at their annual meeting this Friday, October 6, at 7 p.m. – Dan Everhart of Restore Oregon and Richard Engeman of Oregon Rediviva. Both gentlemen are visiting Union County as presenters of the Restore Oregon Barn Restoration Workshop, October 7.

Richard Engeman, a history researcher and writer and Restore Oregon volunteer, will talk about how his interest in the history of Oregon’s foodways led him to volunteer with the Oregon Century Farm & Ranch Program, and then with Restore Oregon’s task force on barns and other historic agriculture structures and to help with the annual barn workshop.

“A sense of place has always been important to me,” said Richard. “I look at how the buildings we build reflect our values and interests.” Richard says the red livestock barn at Union Research Station is a noteworthy landmark that is visually striking for those who live near it, and it is a reminder of how things were done in the past. As an evocative link to a former way of life, “don’t you think we should find a way to keep it?!”

Dan Everhart, Preservation Program Manager at Restore Oregon, earned his Masters degree in Historic Preservation from University of Vermont and spent time as the Architectural Historian for the Idaho Department of Transportation and the US Forest Service. He will discuss the status of historic preservation in Union County and talk about Restore Oregon; what they do and who they are.

Founded in 1977, and originally called the Historic Preservation League of Oregon, Restore Oregon is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization which advocates for sound preservation policy and legislation. Their mission is to preserve, reuse and pass forward the historic places that create livable communities. Each year, the organization provides statewide educational programming and technical assistance, while working to save the sites and structures featured on their annual list of Oregon’s Most Endangered Places. They hold over 40 conservation easements on historic properties, thereby protecting them in perpetuity. Learn more at www.restoreoregon.org.